Photo of Adam Sisitsky

Adam Sisitsky is a Member in the firm and is based in the Boston office. He chairs the firm’s Israel Business Group. His practice encompasses a range of litigation matters, with an emphasis on securities-related issues, and includes significant federal and state court trial experience. He represents corporations, officers, directors, accountants, and other individuals in SEC investigations and enforcement proceedings as well as in civil litigation.

Like Elsa, the Princess in Disney’s classic Frozen, once again the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has utilized its power to freeze. In this case, the freezing of assets. In what has become an increasingly common tactic, the SEC successfully sought to freeze assets of several individuals and corporate entities in a complaint it recently brought alleging fraud in connection with securities offerings for projects under the EB-5 immigration program. As we have reported previously, particularly in the EB-5 space, the SEC has in recent years utilized the asset freeze as an enforcement tool. The EB-5 program allows foreign investors to apply for green cards in exchange for a minimum $500,000 investment in a job-creating enterprise.   Continue Reading “The cold never bothered me anyway!” SEC again uses its power to freeze an alleged EB-5 scam

While issuers and regional centers are the focus of EB-5 litigation right now and into the foreseeable future, if you are taking direct proceeds as a borrower in a transaction facilitated by an EB-5 regional center or issuer you need to have legal advice on the scope of your liability in a deal. Many large-scale EB-5 transactions are driven by a regional center that is facilitating a loan to a project or EB-5 borrower. Borrowers in such transactions often operate under the misconception that they are insulated from liability because they are not an issuer, and that this “insulation” means no accountability to the SEC or to investors.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

The SEC may name an EB-5 borrower in a transaction as a relief defendant in a civil action against a regional center or issuer. An asset freeze, disgorgement and reputational harm, among others, are all possible outcomes if a borrower receives direct proceeds of a toxic EB-5 deal that lands in litigation. The SEC also has the power to sue persons who aid and abet a violation of the securities laws. In the EB-5 context, where borrowers may accompany a regional center on a roadshow or participate in marketing efforts, caution is warranted.

Borrowers in EB-5 transactions should have protective indemnification agreements in place before receiving EB-5 proceeds; review offering materials to ensure the accuracy of any facts represented to investors about their projects; know the background and experience of the EB-5 regional center before closing a deal; and have separate counsel from the EB-5 regional center controlling the offering process.

EB-5 regional centers and issuers take heed. The Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) is pursuing litigation against parties in several EB-5 deals. We expect the SEC to increase efforts to prosecute regional centers, issuers and broker dealers who don’t play by the rules in the EB-5 investment industry. Mintz Levin’s EB-5 Financing Practice just released an alert on limiting securities litigation risks in EB-5 transactions. This is go-to reading for anyone in the EB-5 industry. Here are the highlights of the article, along with a few of our thoughts about concerns that borrowers need to have before accepting direct proceeds in loans from EB-5 regional centers. Continue Reading Securities Law Risk Mitigation in EB-5 Offerings

For alleged EB-5 fraudster Lin Zhong there is a cold winter ahead. A deep freeze. As we expected when news of the case recently broke, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) obtained a court order freezing Zhong’s assets as well as those of her company EB-5 Asset Manager LLC. It is alleged that under the guise of the EB-5 regional center program, Zhong raised at least $8.5 million for EB-5 projects.  Zhong is accused of diverting nearly $1 million to purchase luxury personal items such as a boat, a BMW and a Mercedes. Zhong is the latest alleged EB-5 fraudster to be stopped in her tracks by the SEC.

It is clear that the SEC is now focused on prosecuting EB-5 market participants and issuers who violate the antifraud provisions of Section 17(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5. The allegations here are similar to those alleged in recent cases – the SEC has alleged material misrepresentations and omissions to investors by Zhong.  According to the SEC’s website and recent press release, the Commission also obtained a court order appointing a receiver to administer and manage the business affairs and assets of the company and its subsidiaries for the protection of investors. Continue Reading SEC freezes assets of EB-5 Asset Manager LLC and Alleged Fraudster Lin Zhong

What do a $175,000 Sea Ray yacht, a brand new $100,000 Mercedes Benz S-550 and a $55,000 BMW X5 SUV all have in common? According to the SEC, they were all items purchased by one Lin Zhong (a/k/a Lily Zhong) with money she fraudulently obtained from investors who were told that their funds were being invested in EB-5 real estate development and construction projects. Zhong also purchased with investor funds homes for herself in Poinciana Florida and Worcester, Massachusetts – all while telling investors that 100% of their funds would be used in construction projects and that all investments would be held in escrow until their EB-5 immigration petitions were approved. Continue Reading Life is Larger than Fiction in EB-5 Litigation: SEC Moves For Asset Freeze, Accounting, and Receiver Appointment in Civil Fraud Action in Florida

EB-5 deals present risk for regional centers, issuers and investors.

With the uptick in EB-5 litigation, risk mitigation could not be more important for all stakeholders in an EB-5 transaction.

Hear from Adam Sisitsky, a member of Mintz Levin’s Securities Litigation Practice, on the three D’s of EB-5 risk mitigation: Continue Reading The Three D’s of EB-5 Risk Mitigation [VIDEO]

On August 25, 2015, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filed a civil fraud suit against Lobsang Dargey, a Bellevue, Washington-based real estate developer and alleged fraudster, who also happens to be a brother-in-law of tennis star Andre Agassi. Dargey had ventured into the EB-5 Program as a developer and regional center owner, securing designation by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for two regional centers, Path America SnoCo and Path America KingCo. The complaint is relevant to both investors and regional centers in the EB-5 industry, as well as to lawyers advising issuers in EB-5 offerings. Continue Reading Failure to Investigate Could Mean “Game-Set-and-Match” for EB-5 Investors: SEC Case against Brother-in-Law of Tennis Star Andre Agassi Shows Risk for Would-be Immigrant Investors